Chieftain Pale Ale

Williams Bros. Chieftain Pale Ale

I first heard about Chieftain Pale Ale via twitter, when someone mentioned that it would be on sale in Aldi the week leading up to Burns Night.

It appeared in store last Thursday, but as I don’t normally shop in Aldi, I have no idea how long it will be in store for. It wasn’t with the rest of their beer on what passes for shelving, rather, it was stuffed into a basket in the middle of a random aisle along with a a load of other "Scottish" goods.

While the attractiveness of the display was questionable, there’s was no denying the attractiveness of the price, being a very reasonable £1.39 a bottle. This puts it slap bang in the middle of the 4 for £5 (£1.25 a bottle), or 4 for £6 (£1.50 a bottle) supermarket offers that have been available for the last couple of months. Having said that, it’s only a great price, if the contents of the bottle are any good, so what was Chieftain Pale Ale like?

It poured a pale yellow colour, with a loose white head. The head didn’t hang around for long, dropping to a thin ring round the edge of the glass. Think of the colour of a Czech Pilsner and you’re in the right ballpark. The nose wasn’t overly powerful, but did reveal some bitter orange notes.

It was quite lively with an initial rush of carbonation round the mouth, before it settled down a bit, although it wasn’t overly carbonated. It was the lighter side of full bodied, but not watery, just that really refreshing type of body from a beer that isn’t too sweet. Just like the nose, the flavours were on the restrained side too; with some light, almost faint, citric marmalade flavours, leading to a slightly sweet lingering aftertaste.

It wasn’t a complicated beer, but that was sort of explained on the label:

... designed to slake the thirst of all you folk in need of well-earned refreshment.

I’d just come home from work and wanted a beer that wouldn’t make me think, that I could just drink, rapidly, and feel all the better for doing so. I had three bottles, one after the other. The first hardly touched the sides and I didn’t take notes. The second, felt slightly sweeter, maybe because I was concentrating, so I could try and get something coherent down on paper. The third bottle slipped down much as the first had and didn’t seem overly sweet.

So as a don’t think thirst quencher, this fitted the bill perfectly; that £1.39 per bottle in Aldi at the moment, is pretty good value as far as I’m concerned.

Live Blog: Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013 Grand Final

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013

I’m currently sitting on a train on my way to London, for the Grand Final of the Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013. I’m going to attempt to live blog the event, so updates might be a bit patchy and at the death, will probably appear on Twitter before they appear here. The format for the day looks similar to last year; turn up and drink some beer, have lunch while drinking more beer, find out who wins while drinking beer, then stand around chatting while drinking the winning beer until we’re thrown out, where upon we decamp to the pub.

To be honest, I’m quite surprised by some of the beer we’ll be drinking, as the final twelve are quite different from those I mentioned in my round-up. They are:

Scotland and Northern Ireland

North

West

East

The region I’m least shocked at is the West, as I had a feeling that’s how it would turn out. I’m agog that the Hawkshead Windermere Pale didn’t make it through in the North region though, as that semed to be the popular choice amongst the people I’d been talking to and I thought the two Maxim beers were forgetable. While I’m secretly glad that Ridgeway didn’t make it through the East region, I’m also a bit annoyed, as it means that both the Batemans beers are through. I know that this is all a matter of opinion and that I don’t like spiced beers, but I was really shocked that the Hilden Barney’s Brew made it through in the Scotland and Northern Ireland group; I’ll be avoiding that like the plague laster on.

So, I’m nearly in London. Update will come as and when, so check back…

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Too busy chatting to brewers to update the blog…

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The judges have all finished, the votes are being counted. It’s time for lunch…

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Lunch is over, time to get down to business…

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Annnnnnnnnnd…

Runner-Up

Thwaites Crafty Dan

Winner

Bateman’s B Bock

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Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013 Round-Up

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013

Today is the last day of this years Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt. So if you want your favorite to have any chance of reaching Friday’s grand final, you’d better pop into your local store and clear the shelves. That is, if they haven’t been cleared already, as I’ve been trying to get hold of some more Harbour IPA and Thwaites Crafty Dan, but both my local stores have been out of stock for some time.

The format has been tweaked again this year, with the beers coming from four regions, rather than five. This means that the top three beers from each region go through, so there will be twelve rather than ten beers contesting for the Sainsbury’s listing on Friday. Unlike last year, where I thought a lot of the entries weren’t so good, this year has seen some pretty damn good beer, from all over the country. Before I try and predict which ones will make it to the grand final, you can read what I thought of them by clicking on the links below:

Now for the standard disclaimer. I can only comment on the bottles that I’ve bought (or been sent, although I bought all of them anyway), as with everything on this blog, the reviews I’ve given these twenty beers are just my opinion. You may very well find that you don’t agree with me and that the bottles you have bought tasted completely different; that’s fine, beer is like art, it’s just a matter of opinion. Based on my reviews though, here’s who I’d like to see in the grand final, not that I’d necessarily put all of these beers forward given the choice:

Scotland and Northern Ireland

North

West

East

  • Reindeer Droppings — Ridgeway Brewing
  • Querkus — Ridgeway Brewing
  • Lavender Honey — Wolf Brewery

If attending the last couple of grand finals has taught me anything, it’s that the judges and I don’t agree. So while I’d love to see something like the Harbour IPA, Thwaites Crafty Dan, Hawkshead Windermere Pale, Harbour Porter No. 6 or Hardknott Infra Red win, I’m not even going to stick my neck out. What will be, will be.

I’ll be attempting to live blog from the grand final on Friday. The last time I tried to live blog, I ended up consuming a ridiculous amount of beer, taking twice as long as normal to cycle home, crashing the bike on the driveway and sleeping on the sofa. I think this attempt will go slightly better, although I may end up just posting stuff to twitter

Great British Beer Hunt: Hipsway and The Honey Thief

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013

I had to review these two bottles together really, as Williams Brothers Hipsway is named after an Eighties Glaswegian band of the same name and The Honeytheif was the first song on their eponymously named debut album from 1986. I find it quite interesting that the punters at the Great British Beer Hunt regional heat liked both of them enough to get them through to the final; different, but connected.

Williams Brothers HipswayI decided to start with the Hipsway, a beer that is cold conditioned on an infusion of whole hops and strawberries. It poured a slightly hazy amber colour, mainly as the bottle had thrown a touch of sediment and I didn’t notice until it was all in the glass. The loose white head didn’t last and dropped to a patchy covering fairly sharpish. The nose was interesting, as you could smell the strawberry, it was subtle, but there, lending a nice sweet fruitiness to the aroma.

It was quite full in the mouth, with a soft and delicate mouthfeel that wrapped the palate with comforting flavors. The malt profile felt quite neutral and well balanced with a subtle fruity bitterness, that was pitched so as to be almost unnoticeable after the initial prickle. Everything about it was subtle and soft, even the strawberry flavours were subtle.

Imagine having a strawberry coulis, jam packed with strawberry flavour. Now imagine how your mouth tastes a few minutes after your last mouthful of it, that’s what the strawberry flavour in this beer was like. It was almost like it was the last vestiges of the strawberry flavour, there and then gone. It was an interesting beer with some interesting flavours, but given some of the other beers in the competition, it’s a solid effort, rather than a spectacular one.

The Honey Thief poured a pin bright straw colour, with a solid white head sat on top. While the head dropped to a covering fairly quickly, it looked pretty nice and appetising sitting in the glass. The tasting notes on the back of the bottle claimed that there would be lemon and gooseberry notes in the aroma, there might very well have been, buy my olfactory senses couldn’t pick any of that up.

Williams Brothers The Honey ThiefThey did pick up a hint of honey though, which was unsurprising given that the lingering aftertaste of this beer, is all about the honey mummy. It started out with an initial citric bitter prickle, before giving way to a fruity maltiness and finally that honey tinged, pleasantly bitter aftertaste.

Honey beers can be quite divisive, most fall into the love or hate category. I like mine to have a powerful honey flavour, like Thornbridge’s sublime Bracia, which is brewed with Italian chestnut honey. I don’t know what honey Williams Brothers used in this, but it ticked all my boxes. I thought it was really, really nice, with the honey working really well with the flavour and bitterness from the hops.

Great British Beer Hunt: Windermere Pale and Gonny No Brew That!

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013

I’ve been a bit tardy in getting these Great British Beer Hunt reviews up on the blog, and have a bit of a back log, so here goes. I wasn’t planning on cracking into them last Thursday, but I had an enforced cycle home, due to the car having to stay in the garage overnight, while they source a replacement part. By the time I got home, I was utterly shattered and decided that I was going to have a beer.

Hawkshead Windermere PaleI’ve not had many beers from the Cumbrian based Hawkshead Brewery, but what I’ve had from them has been pretty good. So I decided to start my reviews of the twenty finalists, with their Windermere Pale. It poured a deep straw colour, or a light burnished copper amber if you prefer, with a good white fluffy head.

It smelt absolutely lush, with tropical fruit notes and that definite overly ripe mango that you get from Citra hops; which were just the right side of the cat wee notes you can also get, if you use rather a lot of it. In the mouth it was perfectly pitched body wise, neither too full, nor too light; perfectly quaffable infact. It didn’t feel overly bitter, as there wasn’t a massively bitter bite to it, the bitterness built and lingered the more you drank.

I’m sure some people will find it massively bitter, but it’s more of a flavourful bitterness, rather than a tooth enamel stripping bitterness. This is a seriously nice beer and I’d be very surprised if it wasn’t a contender for the overall win. What a beer to start off with!

I mentioned earlier that I’d had an enforced cycle home. This wouldn’t have been an issue, if it wasn’t for the fact that I’d already swum 4.8Km that morning and cycled 27Km that lunchtime, so I was a bit knackered. I was also suffering some serious DOMS from a gym session on the Tuesday night, so I headed off to have a rather hot bath with a bottle of Williams Brothers Gonny No Brew That!

Williams Brothers Gonny No Brew That!It was at this point, that I realised just how bitter the Windermere Pale really was, as the Gonny No Brew That! pretty much tasted of nothing but some red fruits. I was slightly disappointed, especially given the back label proclaiming it contained "hops, hops and more hops!". As my bath progressed though, the beer revealed itself more and more as my palate slowly adjusted.

Anyway, it poured a every so slight hazy copper colour with an slightly off white head; which dropped fairly quickly to a thin covering. The nose was initially a bit subtle and hard to pin down, but then after you’ve been sniffing a Citra laiden beer, that’s no great surprise.

It felt quite full bodied for it’s strength and tasted mainly of a fruity red berry flavour. It wasn’t overly bitter, to the point where I mused on my Untappd checkin about the lack of hops. Chris Williams replied, saying that it’s massively dry hopped with Amarillo and they kept the kettle hops low, to keep the bitterness low. All of that said, it did taste bitterer the more I drank, so it was most likely the influence of the Windermere Pale. So I have to reserve judgement on this one, it’s possibly good, just how good I’m not sure. I have another bottle, so will update this post when I’ve drunk it.

Update: 19/09/2013
So I’ve tried another bottle of the Williams Brothers Gonny No Brew That! and I have to say, that it’s less a case of Gonny No Brew That! and more a case of Gonny Brew Rather A Lot More Of That Please!. It was like a totally different beer, so I’m not sure if it was just the Windermere Pale or actually a bit of a duff bottle.

The aroma still wasn’t overly powerful, but it did have some nice subtle orangy notes to it; which is at least consistent with being hopped with Amarillo. It was also had a nice bitterness to it, right from the off and lingering into the aftertaste. It was just a really nice, pale and hoppy beer and I could quite easily drink a lot more of it.

Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013

Yes, it’s that time of year again, the Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013 finals are underway, with the final twenty beers on the shelves of stores nationwide for the next three weeks. The format is similar to last years, but with five beers from each of four regions, rather than four beers from five regions. Which also means that the top three beers from each region will progress to the grand final, meaning twelve, rather than last years ten, will battle it out on the 4th of October for a guaranteed, minimum six-month listing in stores nationwide.

The pricing of the bottles in store has also changed this year. Last year, it was buy three for £4, with each of the beers having an variable individual price if you didn’t want to buy three. This year, all beers appear to be a flat £1.50, which makes some of them absolutely ridiculously good value for money. It’s also good the see that only one of this years finalists is in a clear bottle, so a definite improvement there.

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013 bottles 1

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2013 bottles 2

This year the regions are broken down as follows:

Scotland and Northern Ireland

North

West

East

  • B Bock — Batemans
  • Black Pepper Ale — Batemans
  • Reindeer Droppings — Ridgeway Brewing
  • Querkus — Ridgeway Brewing
  • Lavender Honey — Wolf Brewery

As in previous years, the beers aren’t in the main beer section of the store, you’ll find them in the season aisle; this causes the same confusion every year, but there you go. I’ll be posting reviews of all of the beers as and when I try them, and I’ll be blogging live from the grand final on the 4th of October.

Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2013 bottles on the shelf of my local store.

It Pays To Shop Around

I’m back home in Scotland this week, it’s half term, so I brought the kids up to see their Grandparents. I was quite shocked by the cost of petrol at the local garage, it’s 4p more expensive than back home, so I popped up to Dunfermline to see if it was cheaper at the big Tesco, it was.

As it happens, there’s also an Aldi, right next to the Tesco. I always have a look at what beer is available in any supermarket I visit in Scotland, there’s normally something I can’t get back in Cambridge. I also vaguely remembered someone on Twitter posting about Aldi having had a beer festival in the past, so I thought I’d pop in and see what they had. The Aldi near where we live, seems to major in beer from Batemans, so it was interesting to see that this one had more Williams Brothers than anything else. I noted the prices and wandered into Tesco to do some shopping.

When I got to the beer aisle in Tesco, I wasn’t really surprised to see that, even with a discount, they were selling the same beer at a higher price. So after picking up some supplies for a hill walking trip, I popped back across the road to Aldi and picked up a few of the cheaper bottles. Even if you wouldn’t normally darken the door of somewhere like Aldi, I’d rather not, it doesn’t hurt to occasionally pop in and see what they have. It would appear that just like with petrol, it pays to shop around for your beer too.

Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2012 Round-Up

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2012

Today sees the grand final of the Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt and I’ll be there! So while I drink free beer, eat cheese and listen to Jolly Olly, you can see if you agree with who I’d like to see in the Grand Final. Firstly though, you might want to re-familiarise yourselves with what I though of each of the entries, but if you don’t want to take my word for it, then you can get a quick overview of nearly all of them on Landells’ Rock n Roll Beverage. Here’s the links:

The format of the competition has slightly changed for this year, so instead of the top ten going through to today’s Grand Final, it’s the top two from each of the five regions. While this at least guarantees that the whole country has representation in the Grand Final, it could mean that some beer that deserves to be in the final isn’t. I don’t think that’s going to be the case though, as to be honest, quite a lot of the beer in this years competition wasn’t that great, at least in my opinion.

I can only comment on the bottles that I’ve bought, as with everything on this blog, the reviews I’ve given these twenty beers are just my opinion. You may very well find that you don’t agree with me and that the bottles you have bought tasted completely different. Based on my reviews though, here’s who I’d like to see in the Grand Final:

Scotland
Williams Bros Brewing Co. – Prodigal Sun
Harviestoun Brewery – Wild Hop Gold

South East (East, Home Counties, South Coast)
Sambrooks Brewery – Pumphouse Pale Ale
Wolf Brewery Ltd – Poppy Ale
South West (Wales / West Of England)
S A Brain – Willy Nilly
Wye Valley Brewery – Dorothy Goodbody’s Blissful Brown Ale
North England
Wold Top Brewery – Scarborough Fair IPA
Beartown Brewery – Wojtek
The Midlands
Blue Monkey Brewing Ltd – 99 Red Baboons
Ridgeway Brewing Co. – Ivanhoe

I’ve no idea who’ll win, as the Grand Final judging panel will no doubt be a diverse bunch and I doubt they all share my tastes. For me though, there were three standouts, Harviestoun’s Wild Hop Gold, Sambrooks’ Pumphouse Pale Ale and Wold Top’s Scarborough Fair IPA. The Scarborough Fair IPA was my favorite, it beat the Wild Hop Gold, mainly due to it having the bitterness that I thought the latter was lacking.

By the time you’ve read this far, I’ll know who the Grand Finalists are, so you may want to check my twitter feed, as I’ll be trying to keep it up to date with developments. To be honest, I’m quite excited, I can’t wait to find out who’ll win.

Prodigal Sun and Mocha

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2012

I’d been looking forward to this one, as I’m a bit of a fan of Williams Brothers and their beer, so I bought two in anticipation of it being great. Since then I’ve read a few comments about it on Twitter and in blogs, mostly about the fact that it tastes like raspberry jam; since I love raspberry jam, I’ve been eager to crack into one, not sure why I’ve wait so long.

Billed as an Aromatic Golden Ale, I was surprised to see it pour a red tinged brown colour, it certainly wasn’t golden. A loose white head was easily formed, but dropped to a patchy covering fairly quickly. It certainly lived up the aromatic part of its billing, the nose was substantial and pretty complex. It was quite thick with general red berry type notes; I’d love to say what kind of red berries, but I couldn’t pick any one particular type out.

The initial taste in the mouth wasn’t so great, it felt a bit light of body and had a slightly carbonic edge to it. Then the raspberry jam cut in and it was like drinking a liquidised jammy dodger, it was most unusual. The mouth was then treated to quite a cutting bitter sharpness, that rolled around in a slightly watery, carbonic fashion for a bit. It was hard to know if this was from the carbonation or from the hops, but it didn’t feel particularly integrated with the rest of the beer. The aftertaste was slightly sweet, but at the same time not so sweet and mainly tasted of red fruits, but not raspberry in particular, just general red fruits.

I was picking hops while drinking this, so I wasn’t drinking very quickly and it took well over an hour and a half to finish. In that time it changed, all the carbonic edges disappeared and it became more integrated, slightly softer and rounder and the flavours flowed all the way through without interruption. It was a much better beer having sat for a bit, but it was getting a bit flabby as I finished it. I’m still not sure what to make of it though, it was odd, but not necessarily in a bad way.

The first thing I noticed as I inspected the Batemans Mocha bottle, was the little picture on the back label telling me to Serve in a large wine glass, I used my dimpled mug thank you very much. Who do Batemans think I am, Zak Avery? I also noticed that it’s a Vegan beer, with the The Vegan Society trademark logo on there as well, which is quite nice to know.

It poured a serious dark reddish brown colour, not quite what I would describe as mahogany as it was maybe a bit too dark for that, but pretty close. While the tan coloured head was a decent size, it wasn’t until I’d poured about half the bottle that I realised that the head wasn’t really forming. A swift bit of high pouring later, a semi-decent head was formed, shame it dropped to a thin patchy covering fairly quickly. The nose was rather intense, in fact, it absolutely reeked, mainly of chocolate, but with a little bit of coffee hiding around the edges. It was also really annoying, as it smelt exactly like a kind of chocolate I know, but I just couldn’t remember which one, my mind went blank. Unfortunately for me, it just reminded me of the kind of chocolate that I don’t like, I prefer mine to be dark, intensely bitter and complicated, this was all sweet and sickly.

It felt relatively full bodied, but not as full bodied as it could have been, I’m not sure if there was a lack of a bit of body, or the perception of a lack of a bit of body. To me, this beer was all about the chocolate, with pretty much no coffee at all. It reminded me in some ways of Rogue’s Double Chocolate Stout, with the chocolate flavours being almost synthetic; I think that’s what I couldn’t put my finger on with the aroma, it wasn’t an actual bar of chocolate it reminded me of, but another beer. There was a bit of effervescent bitterness around the mouth before the sweet chocolate aftertaste cut in and lingered for an absolute age. Right at the death I think I managed to find a bit of coffee flavour, which was a bit disappointing. Having said that, the coffee in the aftertaste increased the more I drank, so by the end, there was a noticeable coffee flavour, but it still wasn’t as much as I was expecting.

Not really my kind of beer, the chocolate flavours were too much and there wasn’t enough coffee.

Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt 2012

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt 2012

Yesterday saw the finalists in this years version of the Sainsbury’s Great British Beer Hunt hit the shelves of 300 Sainsbury’s stores nationwide. They should be in the seasonal aisle of your local store, if you’re lucky to live near one, until Tuesday the 2nd of October, with the Grand Final taking place in London on Friday the 5th October.

This year’s twenty finalists, four more than last year, have been split into regions. The top two performing beers form each region will go forward to the final, where two overall winners will be announced. The winners will receive a guaranteed minimum six-month listing in stores nationwide from November. The twenty finalists, which are currently on a 3 for £4 offer, are:

Scotland

Traditional Scottish Ales – Double Espresso Premio Caffe Birra
Brewed with double strength coffee beans which give this beer a unique character. A superb silky texture. Great with a good steak or beef dish.
Williams Bros Brewing Co. – Prodigal Sun
A delicate, fruity and aromatic blonde beer. Enjoy with fish and chips.
Cairngorm Brewery – White Lady
Bavarian style wheat beer, with additional hints of roasted malt for colour. Brewed with orange peel & coriander to give fruit flavours with a hint of spice. Good with curries, spicy food, or with barbecue dishes.
Harviestoun Brewery – Wild Hop Gold

A simple malt background and earthy English hops overlaid with citrus and spicy character from the Citra and Simcoe hops. Complements spicy foods such as Thai green curry.

South East (East, Home Counties, South Coast)

Sambrooks Brewery – Pumphouse Pale Ale
A fine citric aroma leads into sweetish cereal notes then hoppy marmalade tones. Drink with barbequed meats.
Wolf Brewery Ltd – Poppy Ale
A delicately flavoured golden ale infused with honey and fruity hops. A must with a variety of world cheeses.
Cotswold Brewing Co. for Beer Counter Ltd – Bad Elf
A light bright and floral pale ale with a bit of a punch. Try with a Thai curry.
Nethergate Brewery – Lemon Head
Lemon and ginger combine to create a wonderful zesty beer. Ideal with spicy food.

South West (Wales / West Of England)

Cotleigh Brewery – Snowy
A straw coloured golden winter ale made with pale Flagon malt and Goldings hops for a full bodied long lasting and morish ale with hints of citrus fruits. Delicious with fish.
S A Brain – Willy Nilly
A distinctive ruby ale with a traditional rich hop aroma, complemented with a fruity and more-ish finish. Goes exceptionally well with chicken.
Wadworth Brewery – Horizon
Pale gold colour with zesty, citrus and hop aromas and a crisp, tangy finish on the palate. Goes well with any spicy food.
Wye Valley Brewery – Dorothy Goodbody’s Blissful Brown Ale
A bottle-conditioned brown ale with a fruity aroma and rich full flavour. It features raisin and malt sweetness and a rounded roast-grain finish.

North England

Batemans – Batemans Mocha
A rich smooth coffee and chocolate beer made with real Arabica coffee and Belgian chocolate
JW Lees – Manchester Star Ale
Hefty body and a deep smoothness. Malt, caramel and unsweetened dark chocolate flavours with modest hopping for balance. Fruity alcohol with a long lingering finish of ripe fruit. Great with game.
Wold Top Brewery – Scarborough Fair IPA
Strong and well hopped with a pale Wold grown malt base, a triple hop blend and maize for good head retention. Serve with hot, full flavoured foods
Beartown Brewery – Wojtek
A powerful, deep golden beer full of character. Tremendous with spicy sausages.

The Midlands

Castle Rock – Screech Owl
A pale amber beer with a distinctive rich pungent hop. There’s fresh upfront bitterness, smooth citrus and a long hop finish. Drink with Lamb Dhansak.
Elgood & Sons Ltd – Indian Summer
A Premium style pale ale, with a golden hue and refreshing slightly sweet palate. Ideal accompaniment for summer foods, fish & curry dishes.
Blue Monkey Brewing Ltd – 99 Red Baboons
A dark and interesting ale, combining fruity hoppiness with a dark, malty side. Great with roasted meats and game.
Ridgeway Brewing Co. – Ivanhoe
An old fashioned, balanced, 100% English, red ale which is neither malty sweet nor overly bitter. Try with good nutty English cheddar cheese.

Sainsbury's Great British Beer Hunt beers on the shelves

I said it last year and I think it’s worth repeating again, I think that this is competition is a great thing and we should all applaud Sainsbury’s for doing it. I was lucky enough to attend one of this year’s regional selection heats and it was really interesting to chat with the members of the public who had been invited along to try all the beers and pick their favourites. I think it’s fantastic that one of the big four supermarkets is engaging with its customers in this way and I’m really looking forward to trying all the beers.